"[W]e take the Batman route; Billy is earning the Slayer mantle."

Jane Espenson [X]

YOU CAN’T EARN YOUR WAY OUT OF MALE PRIVILEGE

W T F STOP

Espenson (she recently announced a digital comic based on her web comedy, Husbands) is collaborating with Drew Greenberg (who also worked with her on the television series) on Billy the Vampire Slayer. “For very good reason, we’ve focused on the female empowerment part of Buffy,” she said, “but I wondered, Did we leave something out? What if someone in high school is looking up to Buffy as a role model, and we’re saying: ‘You can’t be a Slayer.’”

Some things don’t belong to men. It’s okay for there to be a couple fucking things that don’t belong to men.

OH MY GOD

She’s basically saying “but what about teh menz!!”

((primal scream))

———-

um, I think you’re missing the point of what she was saying. Like, I don’t disagree with you, but I don’t think she’s saying “what about the men?” I think she’s saying “we should address femmephobia and its inherent misogyny.”

Harassment, Misogyny and Silencing on YouTube

femfreq:

Here is a small sample of the harassment I deal with for daring to criticize sexism in video games. Keep in mind that all this is in response to my Kickstarter project for a video series called Tropes vs. Women in Video Games (which I have not even made yet). This is the type of silencing that happens when women dare to speak up. But don’t worry it won’t stop me!

[MAJOR TRIGGER WARNING]

Sexist YouTube Harassment

ojwednesdays:

silentpunk:

galentines:

you know what makes me laugh?

how the media keeps calling shows “female led!” “tv for women!” and how people can be like “NOPE TOO MANY FEMALES ON TV!!!”

parks - 3 women, 5 men (if widened to those billed after credits: 4 women, 6 men)

new girl - 2 women, 3 men

30 rock - 2 women, 5 men (widened to after credit billings: 3 women, 10 men)

whitney - 3 women, 3 men

two broke girls - 2 women, 3 men

are you there chelsea - 3 women, 3 men (surprisingly, the only one where females outrank if minor characters are added)

so yeah

look

how saturated

in vagina

That’s disgraceful isn’t it? Also I wouldn’t mind if these shows were actually from the PoV of the woman who is supposedly the star. Most of them are so disconnected from the leading woman’s internal life and feelings because comedy shows are just used to seeing everything from the dudes PoV, writing jokes that dudes supposedly laugh at.

New Girl is meant to be about Deschanel’s character and I wonder whether the actress herself has figured this out yet but judging from, let’s say, the first 5 episodes it’s a show about Nick, and Jess is only in it when Nick is looking at Jess. When Jess leaves the room the cameras stay on Nick and when Jess acts ‘weird’ we don’t really know why but we feel the full spectrum of Nick’s confusion/enchantment/annoyance (conchantance?) bcos of tha male gaze, innit?

So we know Nick and Jess will hook up at some point, probably. So the whole show is determining Jess’ worth by how enchanting and attractive and adorable Nick sees her personality, she is a manic pixie dream girl; they’ll try to tell us this is different because it’s supposedly about her but they couldn’t even make it about her it’s still about her coming into Nick’s life. Again, this is cos apparently when a man isn’t looking at us we cease to exist. If Zooey Deschanel does something quirky and no man is there to see it, did it really happen/do we care? 

/ nicely segued rant about New Girl

reasons i basically watch only mlp in the way of tv shows.

pancakesandplaid:

arseniccupcakes:

bellisadinosaur:

babysitterofdragons:

thegreenwolf:

Hell YEAH. Notice no boob cups in the armor. That’s the real fucking deal. (The divot in the cleavage of boob armor is a weak spot and a good hit to it would smash the center of the ribcage.)

Forever reblog women in proper armour.

YES THIS
Hence forever grateful to a lot of the armor in DA
Except that weird leather armor with bare cleavage.
Like why.

this is who merida grows up to be

This is the perfect example of female armour - and yes, in fact, there’s not much difference to male armour at all.
While the armour in here is likely for sports only its design is still far closer to what medieval women would have worn. Not… metal bikinis.
That and one must remember that there is underarmour to be considered. the padding worn underneath armour - there won’t be much curves of the woman’s body left to be seen once she puts on her gear.

pancakesandplaid:

arseniccupcakes:

bellisadinosaur:

babysitterofdragons:

thegreenwolf:

Hell YEAH. Notice no boob cups in the armor. That’s the real fucking deal. (The divot in the cleavage of boob armor is a weak spot and a good hit to it would smash the center of the ribcage.)

Forever reblog women in proper armour.

YES THIS

Hence forever grateful to a lot of the armor in DA

Except that weird leather armor with bare cleavage.

Like why.

this is who merida grows up to be

This is the perfect example of female armour - and yes, in fact, there’s not much difference to male armour at all.

While the armour in here is likely for sports only its design is still far closer to what medieval women would have worn. Not… metal bikinis.

That and one must remember that there is underarmour to be considered. the padding worn underneath armour - there won’t be much curves of the woman’s body left to be seen once she puts on her gear.

Butch Lesbians (and why they’re not) on TV

iamabutchsolo:

Basically, if we try to think of all the current or recent lesbian characters to grace television, mainly looking at American television, we see that despite the awesome overall increase in visibility of lesbians, it has been a trend that has been almost entirely devoid of butch women. 

Think of the current, most prominent fictional lesbian characters on TV right now: Arizona on Grey’s Anatomy, Santana on Glee, Emily Fields on Pretty Little Liars, Fiona on Degrassi, Lauren on Lost Girl, etc. Look in the past at some other well-known lesbian characters: Willow and Tara from Buffy, Spencer from South of Nowhere, almost every lesbian on The L Word that isn’t Tasha or Shane. These are characters that would not be classified as butch. Maybe they have moments of being tough or handy, but they ain’t butch.

Contrast this with the large spectrum of the kind of gay men you see on TV, from the outwardly flamboyant (Cam on Modern Family, Kurt on Glee, Dean Pelton on Community etc.) to straight-up dudes (John Cooper on Southland, Kurofsky on Glee, Max on Happy Endings, etc.) and complete series themselves that show diversity in gay male characters from the main cast to the one-time characters (Nurse Jackie, True Blood, Spartacus series).

So what’s up TV, why do we see much more gender expression diversity in gay men than in gay women?

Well first of all, this is just a trend in TV in general in which male characters are more likely to show diversity in presentation, thought, and action anyway, since most writers, producers, directors, and creators of television shows are men. So of course, that’s a big reason why you see gay male characters in general, and a good portion of why there’s more variation amongst them.

But if we also think of it as a reflection of the way we view gender expression in the media, it’s because the presentation of gay female masculinity on television is actually a threat to straight male masculinity and prowess. Once the field opens up to more players, even if those players don’t necessarily want the same women, then it’s competition, and therefore a threat.

Hypothetically speaking of course, having a greater amount of butch lesbian characters - ranging from Shane from The L Word to Snoop from The Wire - would mean that they could become heart throbs for female characters and audiences, even the straight ones. Butches definitely bring a different kind of energy to the room that even the most hetero-seeming of women cannot deny and straight men cannot mimic.

And what butchness also does is that it threatens the male gaze, because it does not seek to appeal to heterosexual cis men’s ideal of women in any way. Flamboyant gay/bi male characters are generally two-dimensional and function as friends for only the straight female characters and are not generally a threat, masculine gay/bi male characters give “dignity” to being gay and therefore more okay, and feminine gay/bi female characters can still fit into the straight male fantasy of what a lesbian is, and because they are generally conventionally pretty enough to fit the straight male gaze.

But butch women do not fit into the conventions of the male gaze or support the male gaze at all. Butch women can serve no purpose in the straight male gaze than to obstruct it, refute it and invert it, which does not bode well to the fragile male ego in which everything a woman does or is must appeal to them in some way.

And so that’s a huge reason why you see not only many lesbian characters, but also relationships on TV in which both women are femmes - Callie and Arizona, Santana and Brittany, Emily and all of her girlfriends, etc. It’s safer to present women in love if they are both feminine because it’s gay, but not “too gay.” It’s just gay enough so that you know it’s a lesbian couple, but not too gay in that there is not a clear deviation of gender performance that doesn’t seek to entertain the straight male gaze at all.

And with all of that, even with the emergence of more lesbian characters every season, it’s probably going to be a while before we see a modern butch character to burst on the television screen and change things up.

Cultural Appropriation of Femme Men

You can find this post on Femme Guy’s blog, along with more great content.

Historically, one of the first lines of attack for what we could term the liberal gay and lesbian movement in combating prejudice in the mainstream was targeting stereotypes in the media. And one of the most vigorously and consistently attacked stereotypes was the presentation of queer men as effeminate.

Those of us around at that time will remember the disgust directed at Jack from Will and Grace. Before him there was Jody of Soap, Harvey Fierstein and Scott Capurro’s characters in Mrs. Doubtfire, and Robin Williams and Nathan Lane’s characters in The Birdcage. Conversely, any gay character who isn’t femme is lauded for breaking stereotypes (as if masculinity weren’t itself a stereotype of men).

The reductio ad absurdum came when the boys of Queer Eye for the Straight Guy were accused of incarnating gay stereotypes. One of them in particular (I forget which one) reacted with irritation, because he wasn’t asked to portray any stereotype at all, but was simply being himself.  Attacks on Johnny Weir have cut out the middleman altogether: he’s not even an actor – he’s an athlete – but he’s accused of perpetuating a stereotype just by existing and being famous while femme.

Read More

sanityscraps:

Relevant:

sanityscraps:

Relevant:

neel2bronte:

So a friend of mine just posted this graph on another friend’s facebook wall and usually when I see shit like this on facebook I just get frustrated but leave dumb people to their own dumb lives and hope to never have to deal with them. However this person is a pretty good friend of mine so I spoke up about how I find it offensive and he replied with

I really don’t want to start an internet fight but it seriously makes me uncomfortable that people I consider friends regard me and my gender in this way.
Stay tuned…

How classy. I kinda feel like the more appropriate question to ask about this picture would be “what here ISN’T offensive?”

neel2bronte:

So a friend of mine just posted this graph on another friend’s facebook wall and usually when I see shit like this on facebook I just get frustrated but leave dumb people to their own dumb lives and hope to never have to deal with them. However this person is a pretty good friend of mine so I spoke up about how I find it offensive and he replied with

I really don’t want to start an internet fight but it seriously makes me uncomfortable that people I consider friends regard me and my gender in this way.

Stay tuned…

How classy. I kinda feel like the more appropriate question to ask about this picture would be “what here ISN’T offensive?”

About the “sexism” indignation in the comic book medium.

iamabutchsolo:

spikevalentined:

Sexism” is America’s new “Communism” apparently, people just throw around that word without regards of meaning and implication, just as a quick cop-out for the inability to take an art work for what it is.

To start with, we are talking about fictional characters. Really, to think that this is equivalent to rape, sexual harassment, and other real forms of sexism, is to have no regard for the suffering of those who actually suffer it. And by the way, most media, like soaps, also portray me in a “sexist” manner, like men are walking ATM machines, is it a real issue or is it a medium directed to what the female mainstream wants to see? Are we really going to censor fiction just for an unjustified sense of indignation?

My advice, if you don’t like it, don’t buy it. And if you want to empower the character, write comics, get good at it, and make your stories, and you might even get them published.

It is also laughable to expect this out of a medium that is mostly produced and consumed by male teens and adults (and I am not taking here into consideration the great quasi-feminist works of Joss Whedon, Martin Wagner, Daniel Clowes, Terry Moore, Chris Claremont, Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman… which girls are not seeming to mind).

It’s ridiculous to complain about how this fiction is handled, seriously, if you don’t like what you are getting, just don’t buy it, it’s the first rule of consumerism. Why would want to ostracize the medium? Humans are sexual by nature, and believe me, in the history of art, sexuality has played a huge role in an artistic work, not to mention this actually is very conservative in comparisson (no that that is any sort of merit).

Sexually progressive cultures gave us mathematics, literature, philosophy, civilization and the rest, while sexually restrictive cultures gave us the Dark Ages and the Holocaust. -Alan Moore-

So, lesbians in comics, sexist or progressive?

Roxy & Sarah

Media is a reflection on how our culture thinks, so yeah, sexism in the comic book industry is important, and we definitely should talk about it because it reflects how we as Americans think about women and the level at which we sexualize them. Although the majority of readers are heterosexual men, that doesn’t mean that the purpose of women within comic books should be solely placed in storylines for the consumption of men.

As a gay woman, I really don’t want to see women in bikinis or have no clothes on that don’t serve any other purpose than for the characters to be in these overly sexual positions purely for the enjoyment of men. So far, the only New 52 female hero that I feel comfortable with is Kate Kane as Batwoman, because she feels like a real person and not just a female body.

And yeah, we should obviously be sexually progressive, but comics that overly sexualize women is actually very regressive because it portrays the female body as something to watch and consume and not to just let be, while men in comics are barely sexualized; they are glorified with buff bodies and sometimes glorify hyper masculinity, which of course, has its own problems in of itself that can be damaging to boys and men. However, there is a huge disconnect of the relationships between female comic characters and their bodies to the relationship between male comic characters and their bodies. A man’s body in comics can be used as a tool for heroism in its strength, or his body may not even matter because his powers are not related to it and his costume does not show it. But a woman’s body is too often used for the gaze of men, and at best, used as a tool of seduction which again, is not progressive at all and just goes back to the Middle Ages in in which every powerful woman was deemed a temptress to undermine her strengths.

Plus, I can’t just NOT buy comics; I love comics. And that’s why it pains me so much that I feel like I can barely find a woman in comics who is not at one time or another reduced to a body strictly for the consumption of men.

And yeah, I would LOVE LOVE LOVE to see more lesbians in comics, but I want those lesbians to be more like Batwoman, and not like fake lesbian porn stars who are only there to tantalize straight men.

This is from a piece on Autostraddle called Why Taylor Swift Offends Little Monsters, Feminists, and Weirdos.
 http://www.autostraddle.com/why-taylor-swift-offends-little-monsters-feminists-and-weirdos-31525/
You should go read it.

This is from a piece on Autostraddle called Why Taylor Swift Offends Little Monsters, Feminists, and Weirdos.

 http://www.autostraddle.com/why-taylor-swift-offends-little-monsters-feminists-and-weirdos-31525/

You should go read it.

"

“The really frustrating thing about the “Save the boobies” campaign and similar ones is that it gets it exactly backward. Often, the point of breast cancer treatment is to destroy some or all of the boobies in order to save the woman.

Saying that we should work to cure this disease because it threatens breasts is really upsetting. For starters, it suggests that women are worth saving because they’re attached to breasts, rather than the other way around. But worse, it tells any woman who’s had a life-saving mastectomy that she’s given up the thing that made people care about her survival. What a punch in the stomach.”

"
Randall Munroe, writer of xkcd (via machoslut)